The Friday Tipple: Frosted Boilermaker

Frosted Boilermaker

We’re feeling adult, Boozers. And by “adult”, we mean, of course, that we’re in the mood for an adult milkshake. It’s been that kind of week.

Actually, the term “adult milkshake” does seem a bit silly, sort of like referring to coq au vin as “adult chicken” simply because the recipe calls for wine, or implying that milkshakes are meant only to be enjoyed by children. However, we do enjoy an alcohol-enhanced frosted beverage as much as the next adult, so we decided to continue playing around with the Boilermaker, as we did last week with Dilbert’s Dilemma, and inspired by a brief encounter we had with a Guinness Float at Good Stuff Eatery on St. Patrick’s Day. We call it the Frosted Boilermaker, but call it “Dilbert’s Delight” if you wish, a perfect way to wallow at the end of another week of tedium and toil.

Frosted Boilermaker

We made a Beer Syrup for our Dilbert’s Dilemma cocktail, and it called to us piteously to use it again. Many milkshakes are made with chocolate, butterscotch, or strawberry syrups, so it seemed like a no-brainer to use a beer syrup in the same fashion. You can use ice cream, but we actually like the slightly tangy flavor that comes with a frozen yogurt, which complements the malty undertone of the beer syrup.

2 scoops of vanilla frozen yogurt or ice cream

2 ounces whiskey (we used our favorite Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye)

1 large tablespoon Beer Syrup

Splash of half-n-half (Coconut half-n-half is a nice touch)

1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Whiskey-whipped cream (optional, but you’ll regret not doing this)

Nocello-glazed walnuts for garnish (also optional, but do it anyway)

Place first five ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a tall glass and garnish with whipped cream and walnuts.

Whiskey-whipped cream: whip together one cup of chilled whipping cream, 1 ounce of whiskey, and 1 heaping teaspoon of brown sugar.

Nocello-glazed walnuts: put a small handful walnuts into a bowl with an ounce of Nocello liqueur (or whiskey or bourbon) and sprinkle with a little sugar. Mix together, then pour into a nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Allow to caramelize while stirring frequently, about 3 – 5 minutes, then remove from heat and allow to cool.

The Friday Tipple: Dilbert’s Dilemma

Dilbert's Dilemma

Feeling downtrodden, dear Boozers? We understand. In a world where there are those who delight in stepping on the backs of others to achieve their petty goals, it’s hard to be the guy who just wants to quietly punch the clock and pick up a paycheck. Not everyone cares about movin’ on up, but try telling that to the eager beaver who just assigned you a 200-page analysis of the efficacy of traditional paper clips versus mini binder clips, in the hopes that it will bump them up in the estimation of some pencil-pushing muckety-muck who never heard of paying overtime.

Sigh.

All this means that you’re really going to need a drink when you get home from a weary day of banging your head softly against the wall of your cubicle. A classic drink of the workingman is the Boilermaker — essentially just a beer and a shot of whiskey, clearly designed to take the pain away before the factory whistle has even finished blowing at the end of the workday. We call our version Dilbert’s Dilemma, a slightly more subtle combination that can be savored as you slump gratefully in the La-Z-Boy in front of a flickering screen. Don’t let The Man get you down.

Dilbert’s Dilemma

While a beer syrup forms the basis of this cocktail — a simple combination of beer, sugar, and some spices — it’s the simple act of coating the interior glass with a small amount of orange liqueur that creates a new depth of flavor.

2 ounces of whiskey (or 3 if it’s been a rough week; we like Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye)

1/2 ounce Beer Syrup (recipe here)

1/4 ounce orange liqueur (Don Ciccio & Figli Mandarinetto, Grand Marnier, or Triple Sec will work)

orange peel for garnish

Pour the whiskey and beer syrup into a cocktail shaker and stir briskly to combine. Pour the orange liqueur into the glass and swirl it all around the inside of the glass to coat completely. Add the blended whiskey and beer syrup to the glass and garnish with orange peel. Drink up.

The Snow Day Tipple: Winter Warmers

Potlikker Sangria

It’s still winter, Boozers. While we know that you may be longing for springtime and flip-flops, many of us are still tromping around in snowboots and hunkering down with a bottle of whiskey. And so, with that in mind, we’ve collected for you today a list of warm winter cocktails. Because liquor stores never close.

An Epiphany

Daisy’s Cup

Earl’s Cup

Hot Buttered Rum Toddy

Lavender Lemonade with Hot Gin

Mexican Cocoa Martini with Drunken Fluff

Nutella Whiskey Dream

Parade Punsch

Potlikker Sangria

Sick Day

Sochi Dreams

Tailgater’s Toddy

Tex-Mex Cocoa

And, for those who are feeling a tad more adventurous:

Arctic Char

Blizzard Shot

Gin Mickey

incidental musings on moonshine

Robert Frost-ini

Sochi Dreams

Published in: on February 13, 2014 at 12:50 pm  Leave a Comment  
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The Friday Tipple: Mexican Cocoa Martini with Drunken Fluff

Mexican Cocoa Martini

We’re snow-weary, Boozers. Winter seems to be hanging on with a vengeance and we feel the need to burrow down until spring, so we set out in search of sweet salvation. Believe us, one sip of our Mexican Cocoa Martini and that Doppler radar will be just a distant memory.

And, as if that weren’t enough, we had to top the whole thing off with a dollop of our Drunken Fluff, which, admittedly, is a bit over the top, but we know you’ll agree that it’s as necessary as a shiny red bow on a beautifully-wrapped box. In fact, we predict that you’ll be looking for excuses to add it to waffles, ice cream sundaes, and your morning cup o’ joe.

Mexican Cocoa Martini with Drunken Fluff

This little cocktail packs a powerful punch, so eat a snack before you suck it down. The Drunken Fluff can be made in advance and stored in an airtight container in the freezer — it won’t freeze solid, and can be scooped out whenever you need a little boozy puff of happiness.

2 ounces vodka (we like Boyd & Blair, but please support your own local distillery)

1 ounce Kahlua

Splash of Creme de Cacao

1 teaspoon cocoa powder mixed with  1/4 teaspoon of cinnamon

1 large spoonful Drunken Fluff (recipe below)

Put vodka, Kahlua, and Creme de Cacao in a small saucepan over low heat. Whisk in the cocoa powder and cinnamon until it is thoroughly blended and the liquid is hot but not boiling. Warm the martini glass slightly and pour in the Mexican Cocoa; top with the Drunken Fluff.

to make the Drunken Fluff:

3 egg whites at room temperature

1 cup castor sugar

1 cup corn syrup

1 vanilla bean, split

1/4 cup water

1/2 cup whiskey (we used Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye — you could also use bourbon, rum, or whatever strikes your fancy)

First, make the whiskey sugar syrup. Put the sugar, corn syrup, water, whiskey, and vanilla bean into a saucepan and heat slowly over low heat, stirring constantly for a few minutes. Bring to a low simmer and check the temperature with a candy thermometer — you want to heat it to 220 degrees Fahrenheit, but not any higher than that. Remove the vanilla bean.

While the syrup is coming up to temperature, whip the egg whites for about 5 minutes in an electric mixer, until they form soft peaks. Add the hot syrup slowly in a continuous stream with the mixer running at a medium speed, then increase the speed to high for several minutes until the mixture has a consistent creamy and fluffy texture. Allow to cool and then store in an airtight container in the freezer.

The Friday Tipple: Nutella Whiskey Dream

Nutella Whiskey Dream

We’ve found the new Dream Team, Boozers. Forget sports, we’re talking about a creamy liquid confection that will knock your socks off — although this week’s hot cocktail would be just about perfect to sip on the slopes while watching snowboarding in Sochi. We call it a Nutella Whiskey Dream — but don’t pinch yourself, because it’s real and ready for imbibing even as the Polar Vortex swirls around your ears.

Nutella, that lovely Italian hazelnut spread that French bébés love to slurp off their toasted baguettes before trooping off to school, was in the news a year ago because of a French tax on products that contain palm oil, thereby increasing the cost of Nutella to the French populace. Sacre bleu! Our advice to French senators: beware of renewed interest in the guillotine.

Luckily for Americans, our own senators don’t mind a bit if we want to liberally slather palm oil all over every morsel, so we feel compelled to enjoy Nutella at any moment. Of course, you can also prepare your own homemade version without that nasty palm oil, and thumb your nose at Big Government and Big Industry at the same time. A hipster coffee bistro in the Good Booze ‘hood specializes in a tasty Nutella latté, so naturally we wondered how we might riff off of this in the comfort of our own home. Say hello to the Nutella Whiskey Dream, a tasty little slice of heaven on those long winter evenings by the fire dreaming of Olympic glory. A votre santé!

Nutella Whiskey Dream

We like this with whiskey, cuz we’re ‘Merican, but if you’re feeling particularly Russian, you could try it with vodka (Boyd and Blair would be our choice then). Drink up.

4 ounces hot milk (cow, soy, coconut, whatever you like)

1.5 ounces whiskey (we prefer the spicy goodness of Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye)

1 heaping tablespoon Nutella

Freshly whipped cream spiked with Frangelico liqueur (optional… no, really it isn’t. You need this.)

Powdered unsweetened cocoa, for dusting the whipped cream

Put the Nutella in the bottom of a mug or heat-safe glass; add 1/4 cup hot milk and mix thoroughly, then add the rest of the milk and the whiskey. Stir well, then top with whipped cream and dust with cocoa. Serve immediately.

The Friday Tipple: Cranberry Jelly Shot

Cranberry Jelly Shot

Are you ready for the big day, Boozers? With just under a week until the great Thanksgiving feast, our lists are made and the prep has begun. Naturally, we started with cocktails.

This year, of course, there’s the added pressure of the first night of Hanukkah falling on the same day, creating the hybrid festive day of Thanksgivukkah. This posed a cocktail conundrum until we remembered Mama Stamberg’s Cranberry Relish, a blindingly bright pink concoction of cranberries and horseradish that has been the butt of many jokes on NPR for at least a couple of decades. But we thought… why could it not be the basis for a perfect palate cleanser during a heavy meal?

And so we present you with the Cranberry Jelly Shot. You may recall that we love a jam cocktail, as the pectin from the jam creates a lovely silky mouthfeel; we then pickled some cranberries with horseradish for a garnish, using the resulting liquid — essentially a shrub — to give the shot a bit of a kick. Sit back and give thanks.

Cranberry Jelly Shot

You can use your choice of alcohol for this shot, as it could work equally well with vodka, tequila, or gin, but we suggest an unaged whiskey, often known as moonshine, for its quintessentially American properties, which seem appropriate for Thanksgiving. To give it a Thanksgivukkah twist, try using Catoctin Creek Mosby’s Spirit, a certified Kosher white whiskey.

1 tablespoon cranberry jelly (homemade or storebought)

1 ounce white whiskey or other liquor of your choice

1 ounce cranberry-horseradish shrub (recipe below)

pickled cranberries, for garnish (recipe below)

Put first three ingredients in a cocktail shaker with an ice cube and shake very vigorously so that the cranberry jelly dissolves into the liquid. If the liquid seems overly thick, dilute with a scant teaspoon of water. Strain into a shot glass and garnish with a few pickled cranberries on a toothpick. Can be shot down in one gulp or sipped, and is also delicious if served over ice in a rocks glass and topped off with chilled club soda.

Pickled Cranberries and Cranberry-Horseradish Shrub:

1 cup fresh or frozen cranberries

1 cup apple cider vinegar

1/2 cup water

1 cup sugar

2 heaping tablespoons grated horseradish (from a jar is fine)

1 small cinnamon stick

Put all ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a gentle boil, just until cranberries begin to pop. Reduce heat to quite low and allow to simmer for about 20 minutes, or until thickened. Remove from heat and allow to cool thoroughly. Remove cinnamon stick and put the cranberries and liquid (known as a shrub) into a food storage container and refrigerate for up to two weeks.

 

The Friday Tipple: Burns-erac!

Burnserac

We’ve said it before, Boozers, and we’ll say it again: cocktails create community. Derek Brown, the hip mixologist of the Columbia Room in DC, waxes quite poetic about it, actually, and observes an old tradition when whipping up that classic cocktail, the Sazerac, requiring audience participation: a smidge of absinthe is poured into a chilled glass and the glass is thrown gently into the air, and, as the absinthe coats the inside of the glass during its flight, the assembled barflies all shout “Sazerac!”  just before the bartender snatches the glass from mid-air. Now that’s what we call community.

We were reminded of this again while greedily lapping up reruns of Ken Burns‘ documentary “Prohibition”. Clearly, alcohol can create community in myriad ways — everything from temperance unions to drinking clubs to inebriate asylums — and leave it to the ever-youthful Burns (we suspect he still gets carded) to make it all completely enthralling.

So, we salute Ken Burns this week with the Burns-erac: a whisper of whiskey (apparently an old favorite), chilled Prosecco (he told Liquor.com that it’s his current drink of choice), and a colorful nip of Peychaud’s Gomme Syrup (a simple syrup we made with Peychaud’s Bitters — the addition of gum arabic gives a lovely mouthfeel that you get right in the last sip). Gather together a group of friends while enjoying this cocktail salute, and don’t forget to shout out: “Burns-erac!”

Burns-erac

Chilled Prosecco

Whiskey (we’re particularly enjoy Catoctin Creek’s Roundstone Rye)

Peychaud’s Gomme Syrup (recipe below)

Lemon twist

Fill a champagne flute with ice and water and allow to chill for a few minutes. Empty the flute and pour in a small splash of whiskey, then swirl it around quickly to coat the inside of the glass (you can shout “Burns-erac” here if you like). Pour a 1/2 teaspoon of the Peychaud’s Gomme Syrup (recipe and an alternative below) in the bottom of the glass, then carefully fill the rest of the glass with Prosecco. Garnish with a lemon twist. Burnserac!

Peychaud’s Gomme Syrup: Heat 1/2 cup sugar and 1/2 cup water to boiling in a small saucepan, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to low and continue stirring occasionally for 15 minutes. Mix one tablespoon gum arabic with one tablespoon hot water and stir until dissolved into a sticky paste; add to sugar-water mixture and stir until dissolved. Add 2 tablespoons Peychaud’s Aromatic Cocktail Bitters and stir well. Allow to simmer over very low heat for another 15 minutes, still stirring occasionally. Cool completely before using.

No time to make this luscious syrup? Okay, then just place a teaspoon of simple syrup and several drops of Peychaud’s in the bottom of the champagne flute and mix together. Or use a sugar cube and soak it in the Peychaud’s, then loosen it with a cocktail spoon. It won’t have the same gorgeous mouthfeel as the Peychaud’s Gomme Syrup, but it will provide the right flavor.

The Friday Tipple: Shutdown Shandy

Shutdown Shandy

We’re shaking our heads, Boozers. In days of yore, political opponents secreted themselves away in wood-paneled cloakrooms with a bottle of bourbon, a box of cigars, and a fistful of favors, trading  barbs until a deal was done. This modern game of I’ll-hold-my-breath-until-my-face-turns-blue does not sit well with us, as the trash begins to pile up and valuable medical research is abandoned and firefighters are forced to cool their heels at home. We think it’s time for Congress to suck it up and suck one down.

And so we present the Shutdown Shandy for consideration. Because hot air is still hovering over the nation’s capital, in more ways than one, we’ve opted for a cold one, combining it with a hefty shot of whiskey for good measure. However, it’s the Melting Pot Simple Syrup that brings it all together, a melding of everything that makes America great – sweet, spicy, sour, salty – coming together for the common good. Mix one up, Congress, and get it together.

Shutdown Shandy

We love a good garnish, so for this Tipple we went for some oven-dried orange slices. Simply slice an orange into round disks, dust them with confectioner’s sugar, and place them on a baking sheet in a 200-degree oven for about two hours. Once they’re dried out with a brilliant orange hue, you can store them for a week or two in an airtight container.

12 ounces chilled lager or ale (we used DC Brau’s The Corruption)
1.5 ounces whiskey (support your local economy – we used Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye)
1 large spoonful of Melting Pot Simple Syrup (recipe below)
Oven-dried orange wheel for garnish (optional, but you should do it)

Put first three ingredients in a cocktail shaker, stir briskly, strain into two rocks glasses (because this is not meant to drink alone), and spoon a dollop of the foam left in the shaker on top of each drink. Garnish and toast to your continued friendship and cooperation.

Melting Pot Simple Syrup

1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
1/2 fresh lemon
1 tablespoon freshly chopped ginger
1/2 cup fresh clean basil leaves (we used Thai Basil for an extra spicy note)
Big pinch of Kosher salt

Combine sugar and water in a small saucepan. Squeeze lemon into the pan, then drop in the lemon and add the ginger, basil, and salt. Stir to combine and bring to a rolling simmer. Reduce heat to very low and simmer until thickened, about 30 minutes. Can be strained and stored in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

The Friday Tipple: Clevedale Sunset

Clevedale Sunset

We’ve headed back south, Boozers. Along the miles between Vacationland and the Mason-Dixon Line, the air became heavier, the flower petals exploded in perfume, and we found ourselves yearning for a shady portico. We discovered all this, and more, at Clevedale Historic Inn in Spartanburg, South Carolina, where we were inspired by the stately architecture and formal gardens, along with a great thirst.

When in the South, one feels a necessity to drink whiskey and citrus, but the elegant setting of the Clevedale Inn makes the addition of something sparkling almost another necessity. And so we present you with the Clevedale Sunset, a bubbly sipper touched with a certain Southern languor, perfect for imbibing on the porch as the horizontal shadows lengthen across the lawn and the frogs begin to sing their bedtime lullabies. Lean back, close your eyes, and listen to the whisper of a Carolina breeze.

Clevedale Sunset

We always enjoy the local hooch wherever we go, and several young distilleries are popping up across South Carolina. Dark Corner Distillery of Greenville makes a Carolina bourbon whiskey that we knew would be just right as the base for this cocktail: slightly smoky with just the faintest note of a Carolina pine forest.

6 ounces bourbon

1 fresh orange

chilled Prosecco or sparkling wine

orange bitters (for this we used Fee Brothers West Indian Orange Bitters)

Place the bourbon in a clean glass jar. Cut several long twists of orange peel from the fresh orange and put them in the jar with the bourbon, then cut the orange in half and put one half into the jar as well. Cover and chill thoroughly (you can place in the freezer for one hour or in the refrigerator for up to four hours). Remove orange half and reserve orange twists.

To assemble the drink, pour one ounce of the chilled bourbon into a chilled wine glass and top with four ounces of chilled Prosecco. Yes, there’s a lot of chilling here, but you will be glad of it on a sticky Southern summer evening. Add two dashes of orange bitters and one of the reserved orange twists. Serve immediately.

The Friday Tipple: Michigan Cherry Beer

Michigan Cherry Beer

We’re feeling fruity, Boozers. Now firmly ensconced in the heart of summer, we find ourselves surrounded on all sides by the freshest of fruits, bursting with their warm juicy goodness. On a hot summer day, lazily swinging in the backyard hammock, there’s nothing we like more than a cold beer laced with the flavors of summer.

Last year we passed a pleasant week or so on the shores of Lake Michigan in the charming hamlet of St. Joseph – St. Joe’s to those in the know – and fell in love with a tasty little Cherry Beer Cocktail which turned out to be little more than a standard PBR laced with maraschino cherry juice straight out of the jar. Just goes to prove that it doesn’t take much to create heaven on earth.

We decided to take this one step further in making our own Michigan Cherry Beer, and, with all due modesty, have heard this described as “Michigan summer in a pint glass” by natives of the Mitten State. We agree. Mix it up wherever you are and dream of sitting lakeside beneath the pine trees.

Michigan Cherry Beer

Chill a light summery lager or ale while you whip up the Whiskey Cherry Syrup that flavors this delicious cocktail. As always, we encourage sourcing ingredients that are local to wherever you are at the moment – this is especially fun when you are on vacation; if you can’t get out of town, you might create a vacation atmosphere by finding beer and whiskey local to the place where you wish you were. Dream on.

1/2 cup fresh cherries, pitted and halved
1 cup whiskey (we used Catoctin Creek Roundstone Rye)
1 cup cane sugar
Cold beer (we used the citrusy Shift Pale Lager this time)

Put the cherries, whiskey, and sugar in a small saucepan over medium-low heat and stir well. Bring up to a rolling simmer then lower heat and allow to simmer gently until liquid reduces by about a third and has a glossy syrupy texture (about 30 minutes). Remove from heat and cool completely; can be stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Chill a tall glass then spoon about two tablespoons of the Whiskey Cherry Syrup into the bottom of the glass, being sure to include a few cherries. Fill the rest of the glass with chilled beer and stir gently with a bar spoon. Garnish with a fresh cherry and enjoy.

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